Plans to make Stirling a place where pollinators can thrive by increasing the diversity of plants and habitats across the region are out for consultation.
Plans to make Stirling a place where pollinators can thrive by increasing the diversity of plants and habitats across the region are out for consultation. An engagement survey, https://engage.stirling.gov.uk/en-GB/folders/pollinator-strategy, is giving communities the chance to help Stirling Council create new habitats, including grasslands rich in wildflowers and community orchards, to attract and protect bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

An engagement survey is giving communities the chance to help Stirling Council create new habitats, including grasslands rich in wildflowers and community orchards, to attract and protect bees, butterflies and other pollinators.

Residents will be able to give their views on the new Stirling Pollinator Action Plan, which will remodel the way the Council manages greenspaces to reverse the dramatic decline of pollinators and help to meet our goal of becoming a carbon zero society.

Developed with a range of experts

The Stirling Pollinator Action Plan, which has been developed in partnership with a range of experts in the field, including On The Verge, Plantlife Scotland, Pesticide-Free Scotland, NatureScot, Buglife and Butterfly Conservation Scotland, will help deliver the Council’s Climate & Nature Emergency Plan 2021-2045 and Alive with Nature Plan.

As part of the survey, an interactive map will allow residents to pinpoint greenspaces across the Council area that they believe could be used to conserve Stirling’s vital pollinating insects. The plan will cover greenspaces including parks, closed cemetery sites, amenity land and road-verges.

Helping widlflowers to flourish

Convener of the Environment and Housing Committee, Councillor Jim Thomson said: “The Pollinator Action Plan will be one of the main pillars in Stirling’s efforts to tackle the climate and nature crises head on, remodelling the way the Council manages greenspaces in order to help wildflowers flourish and support pollinators.

“Everyone wants Stirling to be a greener, healthier place to live and the Council is aware we must do more to protect these threatened pollinators that work so hard in our parks, gardens and countryside.

“It’s important we capture as many voices as possible across our communities to make sure our Action Plan helps deliver this, so please join us by making Stirling a better place for pollinators.”

Consulting with our local communities

The engagement survey is seeking local communities views on future land maintenance approaches including:

  • Rewilding – Review grounds maintenance grass cutting frequencies to encourage grasslands.
  • Naturalised areas – principally reduced/altered maintenance of grass areas through use of wildflowers, tree planting, orchards etc.
  • Pesticide use – Options for reducing or eliminating pesticide use.
  • Verge maintenance – proposals to amend verge maintenance to enhance biodiversity.
  • Annual bedding – exploring options including use of wildflowers, hardy annuals and perennials.
  • Community Food Growing - Identifying land for potential food growing.

Environmental issues at the heart of future plans

Vice Convener, Council Danny Gibson, said: “Stirling Council has wide ranging responsibilities, services and land holdings and is in a unique position to help safeguard our local pollinators.

“Environmental issues are at the heart of our future plans and our Pollinator Action Plan will help to reverse the decline in bees, butterflies and other insects by providing food and places of refuge for pollinators.

“I would urge residents, organisations and businesses to get involved in our consultation exercise to help us shape our plans for the immediate and long-term future.”

Following on from the community engagement through the “Engage Platform”, a final Stirling Pollinator Action Plan will be presented to a future Environment and Housing Committee for agreement.